History

 

The Gibson Center emerged from seeds planted in 1973. At that time, an ambitious group of volunteers, local churches, and the Memorial Hospital began the first senior nutrition program in the Mount Washington Valley area.

It started with 12-15 seniors receiving daily meals in their homes, and eventually led to congregate meals served at churches on a rotating basis.

Through the tireless efforts of Glenna Mori, the former summer home of financier and philanthropist Harvey Dow Gibson was leased from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Manchester. The Tri-County Community Action Program was instrumental in funding kitchen and dining room construction. In 1979, a board of directors was created, by-laws were drawn up and Glenna Mori became the Center’s first Executive Director.

In 2000, a successful capital campaign enabled us to purchase our building from the Diocese of Manchester and construct a 2400 square foot addition with a new dining room and kitchen.

More than thirty years later, the Gibson Center now serves over 62,000 meals per year. The Center is thriving from dawn to dusk with activities and community events, and we have two vans for transportation services. Our ONE MILLIONTH MEAL was served on April 7, 2006 and was marked with a gala celebration.

One of the busiest areas is the Glenna Mori Activity Room. The Kay Reed and Carroll Reed rooms pay tribute to the Reeds, who were the catalysts for “modern” skiing in the United States. For decades, the Carroll Reed Shop was a landmark for the latest in ski wear and equipment. Kay and Carroll also set the highest imaginable standards for customer service. The Sprague Dining Room honors Charlie Sprague, an enthusiastic long time supporter of the Gibson Center and a prime example of thoughtful philanthropy in the 21st Century.

In July of 2005, the Gibson Center assumed ownership of Silver Lake Landing- a gorgeous facility on the shores of Silver Lake with 19 independent living apartments.

Gibson Elephants - Copy (640x597)

(A circus parade passes by the present day Gibson Center. Circa 1900.)